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Journal of Arid Land

Article Title

Effects of moisture and carbonate additions on CO2 emission from calcareous soil during closed–jar incubation

Abstract

Calcareous soil contains organic and inorganic carbon (C) pools, which both contribute to CO2 emission during closed-jar incubation. The mineralization of organic C and dissolution of inorganic C are both related to soil moisture, but the exact effect of water content on CO2 emission from calcareous soil is unclear. The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of soil water content (air-dried, 30%, 70%, and 100% water-holding capacity (WHC)), carbonate type (CaCO3 or MgCO3), and carbonate amount (0.0, 1.0%, and 2.0%) on CO2 emission from calcareous soil during closed-jar incubation. Soil CO2 emission increased significantly as the water content increased to 70% WHC, regardless of whether or not the soil was amended with carbonates. Soil CO2 emission remained the same or increased slowly as the soil water content increased from 70% WHC to 100% WHC. When the water content was ≤30% WHC, soil CO2 emission from soil amended with 1.0% inorganic C was greater than that from unamended soil. When the soil water content was 70% or 100% WHC, CO2 emission from CaCO3 amended soil was greater than that from the control. Furthermore, CO2 emission from soil amended with 2.0% CaCO3 was greater than that from soil amended with 1.0% CaCO3. Soil CO2 emission was higher in the MgCO3 amended soil than from the unamended soil. Soil CO2 emission decreased as the MgCO3 content increased. Cumulative CO2 emission was 3–6 times higher from MgCO3 amended soil than from CaCO3 amended soil. There was significant interaction effect between soil moisture and carbonates on CO2 emission. Soil moisture plays an important role in CO2 emission from calcareous soil because it affects both biotic and abiotic processes during the closed-jar incubation.

First Page

37

Last Page

43

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